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To be Accountable…Or is that someone else’s job?

A common theme that emerges through our work with clients is a pattern of behaviour within teams where the behaviours associated with Red Energy tend to be given away or discounted.  By this we mean, challenging other team members around performance issues or unproductive behaviours.  Holding your colleagues accountable for their performance is an essential part of being a high performing team, as is being held accountable by others for your own performance.

When working with a company to improve performance we would typically run a couple of processes simultaneously to help identify underlying performance issues.  Starting with some behavioural profiling using our preferred C-Me Colour Profile we can build a picture of the behavioural preferences within a team.  At the same time we would have the delegates complete a team assessment survey to assess their performance based on Lencioni’s 5 Dysfunctions of a Team.

If we find the C-Me profiles suggesting that Red Energy appears to be the least preferred we will almost certainly find that ‘Avoidance of Accountability’ will also be the lowest score on the Lencioni survey.  The question is, are the two directly related?  Our experience would suggest they absolutely are.

The team wheel above shows a team where no team member has a first preference for Red Energy.  There are team members where Red Energy is a second preference with Blue or Yellow being the first preference.  The triangle opposite the team wheel shows the corresponding Lencioni scores showing the avoidance of accountability is the area with the lowest score.  The lowest score indicates this is a set of behaviours that the team do not feel they are particularly good at.

When a team is discounting the need to challenge each other on performance issues and prefer to wait on others or other teams to perform they are avoiding accountability for their own performance.  Will the team achieve great results is they are not holding each other accountable?

When we deliver follow-up sessions to explore this issue we can quickly dispel the belief that using Red Energy is counter-productive and is the only avenue to creating improved performance.  Our results, thus far, is that targeting the avoidance of accountability and linking these behaviours to a discounting of Red Energy has created a dramatic improvement in performance.

To find out more about how we can assist you develop greater accountability within your organisation please contact us.

Paul McGowran
listen@seekfirst.co.uk

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